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University Updates on Coronavirus

Implementing Evidence-Based Interventions to Prevent Chronic Disease through HBCUs
Dr. Melicia Whitt-Glover, funded by the National Institute of Health

In partnership with Wake Forest School of Medicine, the WSSU Implementing Evidence-Based Interventions to Prevent Chronic Disease through HBCUs project evaluates the capacity for D&I of EBIs for chronic disease prevention and treatment in low-income, high-risk populations. 86 million adults have prediabetes and are at high risk for joining the 29.1 million Americans who already have type 2 diabetes without appropriate intervention. These Americans who are at high risk will add to the staggering $245 billion in annual health care costs currently being spent on diabetes in the U.S. Winston-Salem State researchers on this project: (1) Conduct formative assessment to identify facilitators for and barriers to D&I of EBIs in low-income, high-risk communities through HBCUs; (2) Adapt, pilot test, and evaluate a curriculum for training HBCU students to facilitate EBIs in low-income, high-risk communities; and (3) explore the feasibility for expanding our D&I model to other HBCUs and chronic disease outcomes with long term intentions to determine whether the HBCU model is successful for preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes onset by achieving DPP goals in underserved groups.



Childhood Health and Obesity InitiativeCynthia Williams Brown

Dr. Cynthia Williams-Brown funded by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

With obesity in children and adolescents having more than tripled during the last 30 years and with 17% of children between the ages of 2-19 being obese according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) there is a national need to address this trend. Low-income and minority children, specifically African Americans, appear to be disproportionately affected by obesity. The WSSU-Child Health and Obesity Initiative  (1) assesses improvements in obesity risk factors (selected nutrition and physical activity behaviors) and body mass index (BMI) in children in the intervention group compared to those in the control group; (2) examines the changes in the body image, self-esteem, and academic performance of children in the intervention group compared to children in the control group; (3) examines changes in attitudes and behaviors of parents in each group; and (4) evaluates the participants’ changes in behavior and attitudes beyond the program at a one-year follow-up.


Indices for Accelerated Aging in Obesity and Diabetes: A Diversity Supplement to the look AHEAD Study
Felicia Griffin

In collaboration with Wake Forest School of Medicine’s Action for Health in Diabetes Extension Study Biostatistics Research Center, Dr. Felicia Griffin’s project Indices for Accelerated Aging in Obesity and Diabetes: A Diversity Supplement to the look AHEAD Study is an observational cohort study following 4,000 participants with new assessments of the health problems of greatest concern in older, obese individuals with Type 2 Diabetes. The project addresses important public health priorities for a rapidly growing under-studied segment of the US population in a cost-effective manner.  



Rehabilitation of Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Rehabilitation Counselor Training in a Virtual Environment
Dr. Robin Dock funded by US Department of Education

A six-year project led by Dr. Robin Dock, Rehabilitation of Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Rehabilitation Counselor Training in a Virtual Environment, utilizes distance learning modalities, while integrating highly interactive web-based conferencing and an on-line course management system to increase flexibility, accessibility, and on-going support for adult learners to continue their education while maintaining their jobs and family responsibilities. The project increases the supply of qualified Rehabilitation Counselors to assist consumers of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies, by improving the specialized skills of VR counseling scholars so that upon successful completion of their Rehabilitation Counseling master’s degree program, they are prepared to effectively meet the needs and demands of consumers with disabilities and employers, specifically consumers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.